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Marty Nathan: Recap of Springfield Climate March

On Monday, October 20, Climate Action NOW, Arise for Social Justice, the North End Organizing Network and our 27 other ally organizations in the 2014 Springfield Climate Justice March made history.With our dual-origin march from the Latino North End and Mason Square, we brought over 200 people together on the steps of City Hall for a rally as diverse in its age, ethnicity, race, religion and language as were its speakers. All were there to support the passage by the City Council of the Springfield Climate Action Plan, to mitigate global warming by cutting the city’s carbon emissions.

The rally featured the newly-minted movement anthem “This Changes Everything” performed by songwriter Ben Grosscup, inspiration by Episcopal Bishop Doug Fisher, Mason Square Health Task Force leader Wanda Givens, and Michaelann Bewsee of Arise, and students and activists from throughout the City. Michaelann, Armando Perez of NEON, and Ernesto Cruz spoke of the need to see the resolution for a climate action plan being considered by the Council as the beginning of a process to clean the City’s air leading to lower asthma and emphysema rates, while providing jobs, lower electricity and heating costs, fresh food and safer communities, while   at the same time stopping climate change on the local level. Armando Perez referred to the ideas for the climate change plan that had flowed from community organizing  meetings: increased insulation, gardens, LED lights and solar panels for public housing; more recycling and composting to cut garbage burning; making industry cut its emissions and take responsibility for its pollution; providing usable sidewalks and bike paths particularly in areas like the North End polluted by traffic though their residents own fewer cars per capita than most New Englanders. These are some of the measures that the community will be calling for in our efforts to make the Springfield Climate Action Plan truly a Springfield Climate Justice Action Plan.

The Raging Grannies ushered us into the building with song. In the foyer the group spontaneously began the civil rights theme song “We Shall Overcome” and continued it as we filed into chambers. There Dr. Doug Barnshaw of Arise, Sarita Hudson of Pioneer Valley Asthma Coalition and students from the Springfield Central High School Enviroteam exhorted the council to pass the resolution. Wilfredo Pastrana spoke through an interpreter about the need for serving public transportation needs of the city and Milta Franco read the Springfield Public Health Council’s resolution in support of the Climate Action Plan.

Historic? As the City Councilors one by one declared the necessity of the Climate Action Plan and funding for an office to implement it, it was a major step forward by the second largest city in Massachusetts to recognize and combat the source of climate change. But historic also in the character of the coalition that produced it: African-American, white, Latino, young, old, upper and lower valley all brought together by common cause. Organizers admit the power of that coalition was crucial to the momentum to take this first step.

All recognize, though, that this is only a first step. Mayor Sarno must approve funding for the creation of the plan and its administrator. Further, the plan must reflect the needs of those most affected by the city’s pollution who just happen to be the city’s poor and working poor. The historic coalition must gain strength in order to carry the task to fruition: a healthier Springfield with reduced carbon emissions.

Marty Nathan MD, Climate Action NOW and Baystate Brightwood Health Center, both march sponsors.